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Language Policy / David Cassels Johnson.

By: Johnson, David Cassels, 1974- | Washington State University.
Series: Research and Practice in Applied Linguistics. Publisher: London, UK : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013Edition: 1st ed.Description: xvi, 291 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780230251700 (pbk).Subject(s): Language policy | Language planning | BIL5508Online resources: Publisher's Website. | Check the UO Library catalog.
Contents:
Part I Laying the Groundwork: Definitions, Theories, and Concepts
1 What is language policy? -- 1.1 Definitions --1.2 Types -- 1.3 Example language policies -- 1.3.1 A brief history of English language policies -- 1.3.2 Indigenous languages and policy -- 1.3.3 Oil production and language policy in Equatorial Guinea -- 1.4 Discussion
2. Theories, concepts, and frameworks: An historical overview -- 2.1 The origin and development of early language planning scholarship -- 2.2 Expanding frameworks and conceptualizations in the 1970’s and 80’s -- 2.2.1 Dell Hymes’ sociolinguistics -- 2.2.2 Critical (socio)linguistic -- 2.2.3 Expanding frameworks in language planning and policy -- 2.3 Critical language policy (CLP) -- 2.4 Ethnography of language policy -- 2.5 Reversing language shift and linguistic imperialism -- 2.5.1 Reversing language shift -- 2.5.2 Linguistic imperialism -- 2.6 Ecology of language -- 2.7 Educational language policy -- 2.8 Discussion
Part II Findings
3. Example studies -- 3.1 Marilyn Martin-Jones -- 3.2 Feliciano Chimbutane -- 3.3 Florence Bonacina -- 3.4 Angela Cincotta-Segi -- 3.5 Francis M. Hult -- 3.6 Lin Pan -- 3.7 Dafna Yitzhaki -- 3.8 Shannon Fitzsimmons-Doolan -- 3.9 Discussion
4. Findings -- 4.1 Appropriation vs. implementation -- 4.1.1 Finding #1: Language policy agents have power -- 4.1.2 Finding #2: Language policy power is differentially allocated among arbiters and implementers -- 4.2 Language policies as instruments of power -- 4.2.1 Finding #3: Governing bodies use language policies for control -- 4.3 Language policies as instruments of empowerment -- 4.3.1 Finding #4: National multilingual language policies can and do open spaces for multilingual education and minority languages -- 4.3.2 Finding #5: Local multilingual language policies can and do open spaces for multilingual education and minority languages -- 4.4 The multiple layers of policy text, discourse, and practice -- 4.4.1 Finding #6: Top-down and bottom-up are relative -- 4.4.2 Finding #7: Macro multilingual language policies are not necessarily enough -- 4.4.3 Finding #8: Local multilingual language policies are not necessarily enough either -- 4.4.4 Finding #9: Meso-level language policies matter -- 4.5 The nature of language policy text and discourse -- 4.5.1 Finding #10: National language policies are not necessarily ideologically consistent -- 4.5.2 Finding #11: Policy intentions are especially difficult to ascertain -- 4.5.3 Finding #12: Language policy language constitutes its own genre -- 4.6 Conclusion
Part III Researching Language Policy
5. Research approaches and methods -- 5.1 Early language planning work -- 5.2 Historical-textual analysis -- 5.3 Political theory and the law -- 5.3.1 Judicial decisions and the courts -- 5.3.2 Language policy and political identity -- 5.3.3 National identity, citizenship, and language -- 5.3.4 Constitutional and statutory interpretation -- 5.4 Media discourse and LPP -- 5.5 Ethnography of language policy -- 5.5.1 Definitions, benefits, and challenges -- 5.5.2 Method -- 5.6 Discourse analysis -- 5.6.1 Critical discourse analysis -- 5.6.2 Intertextuality, interdiscursivity, and recontextualization -- 5.6.3 Criticism of CDA -- 5.6.4 Linguistic anthropology and speech chains -- 5.7 Discussion
6. Educational language policy engagement and action research (ELPEAR) -- 6.1 Action research -- 6.2 Language policy action research -- 6.2.1 The language policy action research cycle -- 6.2.2 Features of language policy action research -- 6.3 ELPEAR examples -- 6.3.1 Neville Alexander and PRAESA -- 6.3.2 Rebecca Freeman -- 6.3.3 Richard Hill and Stephen May -- 6.4 David Corson’s model for critical policymaking in schools -- 6.5 Language policy engagement: Creation -- 6.5.1 Macro-level language policy creation -- 6.5.1.1 Engaging politicians -- 6.5.1.2 Grassroots organization and political activism -- 6.5.1.3 The courts -- 6.5.1.4 Engaging the media -- 6.5.2 Micro-level language policy creation -- 6.6 Language policy engagement: Interpretation -- 6.7 Language policy engagement: Appropriation -- 6.8 Discussion
7. Research direction(s) and model projects -- 7.1 Topics and contexts -- 7.2 Access and positionality -- 7.3 Research questions and organizing data collection -- 7.3.1 Creation -- 7.3.2 Interpretation -- 7.3.3 Appropriation -- 7.4 Data collection and analysis -- 7.5 Example analyses -- 7.6 Discussion
Part IV Resources
8. Further resources -- 8.1 Books -- 8.2 Journals -- 8.3 Professional organizations and conferences -- 8.4 Organizations and projects concerning language policy and education -- 8.5 Example language policies -- 8.6 Electronic mailing lists which feature LPP information -- 8.7 Websites
References
Index
Summary: "Language Policy provides a detailed overview of the theories, concepts, research methods, and findings in one accessible source. The author reviews the latest developments in research methods, and proposes new methodological, theoretical, and conceptual directions. This book provides guidance for doing language policy research and specific research projects are outlined. A major focus of the book is how language policies impact educational and community practices and how language policy researchers make connections between macro-level language policy texts and discourses and micro-level language practices in schools and communities." (Book Cover)
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Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books CR Julien-Couture RC (Teaching)
General Stacks
BIL CAS (Browse shelf) 1 Available A026660

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Part I Laying the Groundwork: Definitions, Theories, and Concepts

1 What is language policy? -- 1.1 Definitions --1.2 Types -- 1.3 Example language policies -- 1.3.1 A brief history of English language policies -- 1.3.2 Indigenous languages and policy -- 1.3.3 Oil production and language policy in Equatorial Guinea -- 1.4 Discussion

2. Theories, concepts, and frameworks: An historical overview -- 2.1 The origin and development of early language planning scholarship -- 2.2 Expanding frameworks and conceptualizations in the 1970’s and 80’s -- 2.2.1 Dell Hymes’ sociolinguistics -- 2.2.2 Critical (socio)linguistic -- 2.2.3 Expanding frameworks in language planning and policy -- 2.3 Critical language policy (CLP) -- 2.4 Ethnography of language policy -- 2.5 Reversing language shift and linguistic imperialism -- 2.5.1 Reversing language shift -- 2.5.2 Linguistic imperialism -- 2.6 Ecology of language -- 2.7 Educational language policy -- 2.8 Discussion

Part II Findings

3. Example studies -- 3.1 Marilyn Martin-Jones -- 3.2 Feliciano Chimbutane -- 3.3 Florence Bonacina -- 3.4 Angela Cincotta-Segi -- 3.5 Francis M. Hult -- 3.6 Lin Pan -- 3.7 Dafna Yitzhaki -- 3.8 Shannon Fitzsimmons-Doolan -- 3.9 Discussion

4. Findings -- 4.1 Appropriation vs. implementation -- 4.1.1 Finding #1: Language policy agents have power -- 4.1.2 Finding #2: Language policy power is differentially allocated among arbiters and implementers -- 4.2 Language policies as instruments of power -- 4.2.1 Finding #3: Governing bodies use language policies for control -- 4.3 Language policies as instruments of empowerment -- 4.3.1 Finding #4: National multilingual language policies can and do open spaces for multilingual education and minority languages -- 4.3.2 Finding #5: Local multilingual language policies can and do open spaces for multilingual education and minority languages -- 4.4 The multiple layers of policy text, discourse, and practice -- 4.4.1 Finding #6: Top-down and bottom-up are relative -- 4.4.2 Finding #7: Macro multilingual language policies are not necessarily enough -- 4.4.3 Finding #8: Local multilingual language policies are not necessarily enough either -- 4.4.4 Finding #9: Meso-level language policies matter -- 4.5 The nature of language policy text and discourse -- 4.5.1 Finding #10: National language policies are not necessarily ideologically consistent -- 4.5.2 Finding #11: Policy intentions are especially difficult to ascertain -- 4.5.3 Finding #12: Language policy language constitutes its own genre -- 4.6 Conclusion

Part III Researching Language Policy

5. Research approaches and methods -- 5.1 Early language planning work -- 5.2 Historical-textual analysis -- 5.3 Political theory and the law -- 5.3.1 Judicial decisions and the courts -- 5.3.2 Language policy and political identity -- 5.3.3 National identity, citizenship, and language -- 5.3.4 Constitutional and statutory interpretation -- 5.4 Media discourse and LPP -- 5.5 Ethnography of language policy -- 5.5.1 Definitions, benefits, and challenges -- 5.5.2 Method -- 5.6 Discourse analysis -- 5.6.1 Critical discourse analysis -- 5.6.2 Intertextuality, interdiscursivity, and recontextualization -- 5.6.3 Criticism of CDA -- 5.6.4 Linguistic anthropology and speech chains -- 5.7 Discussion

6. Educational language policy engagement and action research (ELPEAR) -- 6.1 Action research -- 6.2 Language policy action research -- 6.2.1 The language policy action research cycle -- 6.2.2 Features of language policy action research -- 6.3 ELPEAR examples -- 6.3.1 Neville Alexander and PRAESA -- 6.3.2 Rebecca Freeman -- 6.3.3 Richard Hill and Stephen May -- 6.4 David Corson’s model for critical policymaking in schools -- 6.5 Language policy engagement: Creation -- 6.5.1 Macro-level language policy creation -- 6.5.1.1 Engaging politicians -- 6.5.1.2 Grassroots organization and political activism -- 6.5.1.3 The courts -- 6.5.1.4 Engaging the media -- 6.5.2 Micro-level language policy creation -- 6.6 Language policy engagement: Interpretation -- 6.7 Language policy engagement: Appropriation -- 6.8 Discussion

7. Research direction(s) and model projects -- 7.1 Topics and contexts -- 7.2 Access and positionality -- 7.3 Research questions and organizing data collection -- 7.3.1 Creation -- 7.3.2 Interpretation -- 7.3.3 Appropriation -- 7.4 Data collection and analysis -- 7.5 Example analyses -- 7.6 Discussion

Part IV Resources

8. Further resources -- 8.1 Books -- 8.2 Journals -- 8.3 Professional organizations and conferences -- 8.4 Organizations and projects concerning language policy and education -- 8.5 Example language policies -- 8.6 Electronic mailing lists which feature LPP information -- 8.7 Websites

References

Index

"Language Policy provides a detailed overview of the theories, concepts, research methods, and findings in one accessible source. The author reviews the latest developments in research methods, and proposes new methodological, theoretical, and conceptual directions. This book provides guidance for doing language policy research and specific research projects are outlined. A major focus of the book is how language policies impact educational and community practices and how language policy researchers make connections between macro-level language policy texts and discourses and micro-level language practices in schools and communities." (Book Cover)

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